A microscale second gradient approximation of the damage parameter of quasi-brittle heterogeneous lattices

A. Rinaldi, L. Placidi

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66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lattice models are powerful tools to investigate damage processes in quasi-brittle material by a microscale perspective. Starting from prior work on a novel rational damage theory for a 2D heterogenous lattice, this paper explores the connection between the series of critical strains at which the microcracks form (i.e. lattice links fail) and the second gradient of the microscale displacement field. Taking a simple tensile test as a representative case study for this endeavour, the analysis of accurate numerical results provides evidence that the second gradient of the microscale displacement field (notably the quantity | ∇ (∂ ux/∂ x)| for the specific example elaborated here) conveys indeed crucial information about the microcracks formation process and can be conveniently used to introduce simplifications of the rational theory that are of relevance by practical purposes as full field strain measurements become routinely possible with digital imaging correlation techniques. Note worthy, the results support the new view that the damage evolution is a three regimes process (I dilute damage, II homogeneous interaction, III localization.) The featured connection with the second gradient of the microscale displacement field is applicable in regions II-III, where microcracks interactions grow stronger and the lattice transitions to the softening regime. The potential impact of these findings towards the formulation of new and physically based CDM models, which are consistent with the reference discrete microscale theory, cannot be overlooked and is pointed out. Lattice models are powerful tools to investigate damage processes in quasi-brittle material by a microscale perspective. This paper explores the connection between the series of critical strains at which the microcracks form (i.e. lattice links fail) and the second gradient of the microscale displacement field. Note worthy, the results support the new view that the damage evolution is a three regimes process (I dilute damage, II homogeneous interaction, III localization.) The featured connection with the second gradient of the microscale displacement field is applicable in regions II-III, where microcracks interactions grow stronger and the lattice transitions to the softening regime. The potential impact of these findings towards the formulation of new and physically based CDM models, which are consistent with the reference discrete microscale theory, cannot be overlooked and is pointed out.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)862 - 877
Number of pages16
JournalZAMM Zeitschrift fur Angewandte Mathematik und Mechanik
Volume94
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2014
Externally publishedYes

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Computational Mechanics
  • Applied Mathematics

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