A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams

M. Rebai, M. Cavenago, G. Croci, M. Dalla Palma, G. Gervasini, F. Ghezzi, G. Grosso, F. Murtas, R. Pasqualotto, E. Perelli Cippo, M. Tardocchi, M. Tollin, G. Gorini

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Abstract

A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams is proposed for installation on the spectral shear interferometry for direct electric field reconstruction (SPIDER, Source for Production of Ion of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) test beam facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission on the beam dump surface by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses gas electron multiplier detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. The cathode is made of a thin polythene film and an aluminium film; it is designed for detection of neutrons of energy 2.2 MeV with an incidence angle 45. CNESM was designed on the basis of simulations of the different steps from the deuteron beam interaction with the beam dump to the neutron detection in the nGEM. Neutron scattering was simulated with the MCNPX code. CNESM on SPIDER is a first step towards the application of this diagnostic technique to the MITICA beam test facility, where it will be used to resolve the horizontal profile of the beam intensity. © 2012 American Institute of Physics.
Original languageEnglish
Article number02B721
Pages (from-to)-
JournalReview of Scientific Instruments
Volume83
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Instrumentation

Cite this

Rebai, M., Cavenago, M., Croci, G., Dalla Palma, M., Gervasini, G., Ghezzi, F., ... Gorini, G. (2012). A neutron diagnostic for high current deuterium beams. Review of Scientific Instruments, 83(2), -. [02B721]. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.3673013